Mar
26
5:30 PM17:30

Artist Talk - Tuesday 26th March

Description

2 hours in length. This is event is an opportunity to hear a detailed explanation of my practice-based research, ask questions, inspire discussions and get involved with this academic research.

Location

Ambika P3

35 Marylebone Road

London

NW1 5LS

Tickets

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/whoretography-sex-workers-as-image-makers-a-critical-analysis-of-sex-worker-self-representation-in-tickets-57278577768

About

Visual representations of sex workers that appear throughout art history are well documented in the academic literature. Debated, and censored sex workers depicted in art have been done so for a variety of reasons, with changing cultural attitudes towards sex work, styles and artistic mediums, visual depictions of sex workers in art have changed over time. With the advent of digital photography and the internet, photographs of sex workers have left the art world and are now accessible in people’s homes. The figure of the female sex worker features heavily in cinema and media.Representations of sex workers who lapses into narratives of pity are heavily portrayed by contemporary images of sex workers. These visual portrayals have typically been created by non sex working individuals and this situation has created a voyeuristic gaze that depicted sex workers either as hapless victims or as complicit harlots upholding the social structures that underpin patriarchy. This narrow visual portrayal of male oppression reproduced a politics of pity and has resulted in a hegemonic visual representation that encourages the sense that the only way of interpreting the lives of sex workers is to see them as ripe for ‘rescue’.

The rise of the internet in the mid-1990s allowed online sex work to flourish, sex workers themselves began to create their own photographic self-representations to sell sex and since then photography has played a vital role in the sale of sex on social media platforms. The internet has allowed female sellers of sex to control, produce and manage the visual façade of sex work, not just feature in them. Sex workers are now visual content–makers a role facilitated by the massive changes the Internet has brought to the sex industry, embodying a technology-led disruption that has changed the fundamental economics of sex work. The widespread availability of information on the Internet has revolutionised sex workers’ marketing techniques and the verbal and visual vocabulary of sex work. Words still matter and have their allure, but digital photographs are now fundamental to the transaction of sex.

The censorship of online sex culture and the eviction of sex workers from the open internet necessitate academic research into user-generated visual data created by sex workers. The discussion of sex workers as image-makers now warrants serious academic attention, and, until my PhD is notably absent from the discussions of online sex work.

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Mar
24
10:00 AM10:00

Artist Talk - Sunday 24th March

Date:

Sunday 24th March

Time:

TBA

Location:

Ambika P3

35 Marylebone Road

London

NW1 5LS

About

How do we visual depict men who pay for sex, and why is there a scholarly silence on the visual aspects of clients of sex workers despite men buying sexual services online since the mid-1990s. Why do we, as academics and visual artists rarely consider the photographic representations of men who pay for sex online? Why do men get to remain relatively unlooked at and unseen in the transaction of sex? In a digitally networked world where players in the sex industry construct visual narratives about themselves through the creation/construction of a self-image, I seek to decontextualise these images by reaching into the circulation of these images on WhatsApp and grabbing visual fragments of the lives of men who pay for sex. This talk explores the connection between the photographic identity that sex buyers construct through their WhatsApp profile photographs, visibility, connectivity and men who seek sex online – the interconnectivity of the photograph used to construct on identity on social media in their everyday life that is also used to arrange illicit sex in exchange for payment. Working with photographs collected through cyberethnographic methodologies my word addresses ways of re-imagining visual user-generated content of sex buyers.

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Mar
22
1:30 PM13:30

Artist Talk - Friday 22nd March

Description

2 hours in length. This is event is an opportunity to hear a detailed explanation of my practice-based research, ask questions, inspire discussions and get involved with this academic research.

Location

Ambika P3

35 Marylebone Road

London

NW1 5LS

Tickets

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/whoretography-sex-workers-as-image-makers-a-critical-analysis-of-sex-worker-self-representation-in-tickets-57278418291

About

Visual representations of sex workers that appear throughout art history are well documented in the academic literature. Debated, and censored sex workers depicted in art have been done so for a variety of reasons, with changing cultural attitudes towards sex work, styles and artistic mediums, visual depictions of sex workers in art have changed over time. With the advent of digital photography and the internet, photographs of sex workers have left the art world and are now accessible in people’s homes. The figure of the female sex worker features heavily in cinema and media.Representations of sex workers who lapses into narratives of pity are heavily portrayed by contemporary images of sex workers. These visual portrayals have typically been created by non sex working individuals and this situation has created a voyeuristic gaze that depicted sex workers either as hapless victims or as complicit harlots upholding the social structures that underpin patriarchy. This narrow visual portrayal of male oppression reproduced a politics of pity and has resulted in a hegemonic visual representation that encourages the sense that the only way of interpreting the lives of sex workers is to see them as ripe for ‘rescue’.

The rise of the internet in the mid-1990s allowed online sex work to flourish, sex workers themselves began to create their own photographic self-representations to sell sex and since then photography has played a vital role in the sale of sex on social media platforms. The internet has allowed female sellers of sex to control, produce and manage the visual façade of sex work, not just feature in them. Sex workers are now visual content–makers a role facilitated by the massive changes the Internet has brought to the sex industry, embodying a technology-led disruption that has changed the fundamental economics of sex work. The widespread availability of information on the Internet has revolutionised sex workers’ marketing techniques and the verbal and visual vocabulary of sex work. Words still matter and have their allure, but digital photographs are now fundamental to the transaction of sex.

The censorship of online sex culture and the eviction of sex workers from the open internet necessitate academic research into user-generated visual data created by sex workers. The discussion of sex workers as image-makers now warrants serious academic attention, and, until my PhD is notably absent from the discussions of online sex work.

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Mar
21
6:00 PM18:00

Hyphen - An Exposition Between Art and Research - Private Viewing

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Private Viewing

Hyphen - An Exposition Between Art and Research will be formally opened by Gregory Sporton, Head of School, Westminster School of Arts on Thursday 21 March 2019.

The private view is from 6–9 pm and is free to attend, but please RSVP here by 18 March 2019: www.hyphen-private-view.eventbrite.com

The exhibition is open from, 22–27 March 2019. 12–6pm daily, late opening for special events. I will be posting details of my events in the coming days.

I will be at the private viewing and be making myself available to speak to guests about my research into sex workers as image-makers. If you have any questions, then please use the contact form.

About

PhD artist and researcher collective CREAM/CAMRI Caucus present Hyphen - An Exposition Between Art and Research at Ambika P3 from 22–27 March. This exhibition brings together PhD researchers, alumni and staff from University of Westminster, showcasing works across photography and film, music, dance and performance art, sculpture and installation art, while also featuring a programme of workshops, talks and discussions.

The hyphen traverses an in-between space, opens up connections, embodies relations, exceeds boundaries. The contributions to the exhibition all deal in some way with an activation of this liminal quality: They investigate the ways in which art can be research and research can be art. They question how knowledge exists in the body and is embodied in objects, images and sounds. They recognise art and research as practices that occur in expanded fields of being, sensing and knowing with others.

The works in the exhibition engage with matters of power, representation and surveillance in the archive or through photographs; investigate memory, mythology and storytelling through film and ceramics; interrogate consequences and reverberations of displacement, decolonisation and precarious or marginalised labour practices. The artwork is seen here as an activator: a material rendering of research which in its own mode of subsistence poses new questions, suggests new trajectories and combinations, eludes habitual modes of being and knowing.

More Information

The exhibition coincides with the launch of the new online journal Hyphen, an open access online journal focused on writing as an expanded and open-ended practice: www.hy-phen.space/journal.

Participating artists: Iwona Abrams, Andreia Alves de Oliveira, Estéfani Bouza, Gilbert Calleja, George Clark, Sue Goldschmidt, Sunil Gupta, Eddy Hackett, Monika Jaeckel, Ana Janeiro Fernandes, Matthias Kispert, Reka Komoli, David Leahy, Trenton Lee, Barbara Matas Moris, Camille Melissa, Jini Rawlings, Arne Sjögren, Deniz Sözen, Jol Thomson.

Hyphen - An Exposition Between Art and Research is accompanied by a series of lectures, artists talks, symposia, performances and audience interactions. I will be posting details of my events shortly.

For more information:  www.hy-phen.space/exposition


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Oct
31
7:00 PM19:00

5th Annual Postgrad Sex Work Research Conference - University of Leicester

5th Annual Postgrad Sex Work Research Conference -University of Leicester

I will be presenting the abstract of my dissertation; Whoretography, is it possible to reclaim the word whore through visual practise as research.

Professor Teela Sanders the University of Leicester Hosts the Sex Work Research Hub's 5th Annual Postgrad Conference. This conference is open to registered Postgraduate students doing sex work related research in the UK.

This event provides an opportunity to present postgrad studies at any stage in development, engage with seasoned sex work researchers, and build networks and relationships among new and emerging scholars who are advancing knowledge in this space. 

Those interested in Attending

In order to keep this event safe for dialogue on new and emerging scholarship, attendees must meet the following criteria:

Be registered postgrad students doing sex work research and/or academic members of the SWRH and/or active or former sex workers.

 

 

 

 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/5th-annual-postgrad-sex-work-research-conference-university-of-leicester-tickets-27927020470

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Jun
15
to Jun 22

Shifting Tides: Reimagining Sex Work, Law & activism in the 21st century

Guest speaker at a symposium at the Dickson Poon School of Law, Kings College London.

I am pleased to announce that I have been invited to be a part of a discussion panel at King's College London. l will  speaking about my experiences within the current legislative frame work and Whoretography at the ‘Regulatory approaches to sex work and consequences for sex workers well-being‘ symposium to be held on June 16th 11am to 6.30pm at River Room, Stand Campus. King's College London.

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May
19
3:30 PM15:30

Undergraduate Pop Up Book Fair

I have been asked to give a talk about the Whoretography books as part of an undergraduate The Pop Up Book Shop is open to the general public & admission is free.

OPENING HOURS

Monday 23rd  –  Friday 27th May 2016

Monday 3 pm - 6 pm (shop preview)

Tuesday 3 pm -  8 pm (Reception and book signings)

Wednesday 3 pm -  7 pm (shop + talks)

Thursday 3 pm -  7 pm (shop + talks)

Friday 1 pm -  4 pm (shop + talks)

 

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