The digital looking glass ...

I made a promise to feature the photographic work of sex workers.  To shatter the ways of seeing, looking and gazing upon their lives and bodies.  To call out the visual rhetoric that has been depicting sex workers as hapless victims since 1888 and the release of the morgue photos of  Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes and Mary Jane Kelly.

It's fair to say that Whoretography is a digital visual anthropological research endeavour into the photographic culture of contemporary sex workers who ply their trade in a hostile and unwelcoming digital space. I could write endlessly on surveillance, the construction of oneself and the merging of our online and offline selves, and the difference between looking and gazing. However, I thought it would be to let trans and disabled sex worker Lindsey Weiss tell us in her own words what it is like to be seen and looked at through digital looking glass ...

I was interested in thinking about how my body, as a stripper and cammer, is disseminated through a variety of digital lenses imposed by my audience and my clients. It becomes an almost Frankenstein-like assemblage comprised of the ideas that my viewers have about it. Particularly as a trans and disabled person, I was thinking about how much of the materiality of my body, being subject to so much state surveillance, changes as I navigate the sex work floor.

Photographs & and the showing of face has been done so with permission from Lindsey Weiss.  To see more of Lindsey's remarkable work, please follow her on the twitter @cardiolover666 and instagram is @sister.winter !